Sprint Running

Sprints are short running events in athletics and track and field. Races over short distances are among the oldest running competitions. The first 13 editions of the Ancient Olympic Games featured only one event—the stadion race, which was a race from one end of the stadium to the other. There are three sprinting events which are currently held at the Summer Olympics and outdoor World Championships: the 100 metres200 metres, and 400 metres. These events have their roots in races of imperial measurements which were later altered to metric: the 100 m evolved from the 100 yard dash, the 200 m distances came from the furlong (or 1/8 of a mile), and the 400 m was the successor to the 440 yard dash or quarter-mile race.

At the professional level, sprinters begin the race by assuming a crouching position in the starting blocks before leaning forward and gradually moving into an upright position as the race progresses and momentum is gained. The set position differs depending on the start. Body alignment is of key importance in producing the optimal amount of force. Ideally the athlete should begin in a 4-point stance and push off of both legs for the most force production. Athletes remain in the same lane on the running track throughout all sprinting events, with the sole exception of the 400 m indoors. Races up to 100 m are largely focused upon acceleration to an athlete’s maximum speed. All sprints beyond this distance increasingly incorporate an element of endurance. Human physiology dictates that a runner’s near-top speed cannot be maintained for more than 30–35 seconds due to the accumulation of lactic acidin muscles.

The 60 metres is a common indoor event and it is an indoor world championship event. Less common events include the 50 metres55 metres300 metres and 500 metres which are used in some high school and collegiate competitions in the United States. The 150 metres, though rarely competed, has a star-studded history:Pietro Mennea set a world best in 1983, Olympic champions Michael Johnson and Donovan Bailey went head-to-head over the distance in 1997, and Usain Boltimproved Mennea’s record in 2009.

Reference: Wikipedia Sprint Running

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Sport Fishing

Sport fishing

Sport fishing methods vary according to the area fished, the species targeted, the personal strategies of the angler, and the resources available. It ranges from the aristocratic art of fly fishing elaborated in Great Britain, to the high-tech methods used to chase marlin and tuna. Sport fishing is usually done with hook, line, rod and reel rather than with nets or other aids.

The most common salt water game fish are marlintunatarponsailfishshark, and mackerel.

In North America, freshwater fish include snookredfishsalmontroutbasspikecatfishwalleye and muskellunge. The smallest fish are called panfish, because they can fit whole in a normal cooking pan. Examples are perch andsunfish.

In the past, sport fishers, even if they did not eat their catch, almost always killed them to bring them to shore to be weighed or for preservation as trophies. In order to protect recreational fisheries sport fishermen now often catch and release, and sometimes tag and release, which involves fitting the fish with identity tags, recording vital statistics, and sending a record to a government agency.

Reference: Wikipedia Sport Fishing

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Speed Skating

Speed skating, or speedskating is a competitive form of ice skating in which the competitors race each other in traveling a certain distance on skates. Types of speed skating are long track speed skatingshort track speed skating, and marathon speed skating. In the Olympic Games, long track speed skating is usually referred to as just “speed skating”, while short track speed skating is known as “short track”. The ISU, the governing body of both ice sports, refers to long track as “speed skating” and short track as “short track skating”.

Reference: Wikipedia Speed Skating

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